Your Life in Numbers

a project of HumanProgress

Explore how much the world has changed since you were born

Is life getting better or worse? Watching the news, it’s easy to become pessimistic. But don’t forget that reporting is often selective. Bad news leads to higher ratings, while good news is seldom covered. So, what is the real state of humanity? Consider the changes that have occurred in the world over the last half-century.

Those are global improvements. What about life in your country? See the changes that have happened in your lifetime, and share the results with your family and friends – just enter the country and year of your birth.

Note: Values displayed are based on the nearest match for birth year and current year

Of course, the pace of progress varies and depends on, among other things, ideas, policies and institutions in individual countries. For example, some of the greatest improvements in recent decades have been experienced by developing countries, which are increasingly participating in the global economy, growing, and catching up with the developed world – thus decreasing global inequality. To compare your results with your contemporaries elsewhere, follow Step 3 below.

Note: Values displayed are based on the nearest match for birth year and current year

“Your life in numbers” is brought to you by HumanProgress, which is a data-driven educational website devoted to improving the public’s understanding of the state of the world. All of our statistics come from reputable sources. Hover over the name of a statistic to see its definition or click on the name of a statistic to further interact with the data.

Hide absolute value over time
Country Life expectancy at birth,
years
Infant mortality rate
per 1,000 live births
GDP, per person
2015 U.S. dollars, PPP
Food supply
per person, per day, calories
Mean years of schooling,
number
Index of Democracy,
scale -10 to 10
Birth Year:
Current Year:
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Note: Values displayed are based on the nearest match for birth year and current year
Country Life expectancy at birth,
years
Infant mortality rate
per 1,000 live births
GDP, per person
2015 U.S. dollars, PPP
Food supply
per person, per day, calories
Mean years of schooling,
number
Index of Democracy,
scale -10 to 10
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
Birth Year:
Current Year:
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Current Year:
Birth Year:
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Current Year:
Note: Values displayed are based on the nearest match for birth year and current year
LIFE EXPECTANCY
INFANT SURVIVAL
INCOME PER PERSON
FOOD SUPPLY PER PERSON
MEAN YEARS OF SCHOOLING
LEVEL OF DEMOCRACY
2314
2386
2249
2126
3246
2560
Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of his or her birth were to stay the same throughout his or her life.
Infant survival reflects changes in the infant mortality rate, which is the ratio of the number of deaths in the first year of life to the number of live births occurring in the same population during the same period of time.
The gross domestic product reflects the total value of goods produced and services provided in a country during one year. It is expressed in constant 2015 U.S. dollars (i.e., it is adjusted for changes in the value of currency over time). It is also adjusted for differences in buying power between countries. Finally, it is divided by the population.
Food supply refers to the amount of food available for each individual in the population each day. Actual food consumption may be lower than the quantity of food available, depending on how much food is wasted, thrown away, fed to animals, etc.
This dataset uses school enrollment census and survey data to estimate the average number of years of schooling in the population by assuming that a change in enrollment leads to a proportional change in educational attainment over time.
This dataset distinguishes between democratic and autocratic patterns of authority, with higher numbers indicating more democratic regimes and lower numbers indicating more autocratic regimes.